Bob Anderson

Campbeltown-built Aquarius INS 222 (Yard No. 23) – made for Cyril Scott of Lossiemouth in 1975. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

My name is Bob Anderson. I left school at 15, on 2nd January, 1980, to pursue a career in the fishing, as it was always my passion to be a fisherman. I am originally from Burghead but have lived in Lossiemouth for many years now. I always had a great admiration for Campbeltown Shipyard builds. I sailed on four of them throughout my fishing career: the Fertile INS 222, formerly the Aquarius INS 222 (Yard No. 23) which as built in Campbeltown for Cyril Scott in 1975. She was bought and renamed the Fertile in June 1980 by Brian Walker. On 22nd April 1981 Fertile started to fill with water and sank almost 200 miles NE of Aberdeen. Fortunately the crew, including myself, all got off safely. I worked aboard the Advance I (formerly the Karen Anne INS 61 – Yard No. 68) and the Advance II (Formerly the Brereton INS 97 – Yard No.78).  I was also aboard Mary Croan INS 231 (Yard no. 20), another Campbeltown-built boat made in 1974 for Thomas Sutherland of Hopeman. Mary Croan sank off Uig but was lifted by Fred Elder of Gairloch and was refurbished for Alf Kennedy. 

Campbeltown-built Aquarius INS 222 (Yard No. 23) – made for Cyril Scott of Lossiemouth in 1975. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Campbeltown-built Aquarius INS 222 (Yard No. 23) – made for Cyril Scott of Lossiemouth in 1975. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

The Campbeltown boats were very good sea boats, very well fitted out, from the first build, Crimson Arrow, to the trawlers Steadfast and Shemarah II. The Campbell Brothers started the trend by building the first 80 footer at the yard in 1972, launched in June of that year, Argosy INS.79 was built for Andrew Campbell of Lossiemouth and, later that year, the second one was launched for his brother Wille Campbell (MBE), Ajax INS.82, later in 1975. Willie built the first 85 footer, Ajax INS.168. I always thought she was the bonniest one they built, breaking a few fishing records throughout her fishing career. His brother, Jim Campbell, built the Andromeda INS.167, also in 1975. The Campbeltown Shipyard went on to build a lot of record breaking, top class fishing vessels afterwards, until, sadly, the yard closed.

Campbeltown-built Argosy INS 79 (Yard No. 11) – made for Andrew Campbell of Lossiemouth in 1972. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Campbeltown-built Ajax INS 82 (Yard No. 11) – made for Willie Campbell of Lossiemouth in 1972. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Campbeltown-built Ajax INS 82 (Yard No. 11) – made for Willie Campbell of Lossiemouth in 1972. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Campbeltown-built Kestrel INS 253 (Yard No. 40) – made for Ian Sutherland of Hopeman in 1978. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Campbeltown-built Karen Anne INS 61 (Yard No. 68) – made for Ronnie Main of Lossiemouth in 1984. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Campbeltown-built Emma Thompson INS 100 (Yard No. 28) – made for A Thompson of Lossiemouth in 1975. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Campbeltown-built Defiance INS 19 (Yard No. 25) – made for William More of Burghead in 1975. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Newspaper cutting  (source unknown) about the launch of the Campbeltown-built Cavalier INS 109 (Yard No. 14) – made for J. McPherson of Hopeman in 1973. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Newspaper cutting (Source unknown) about the Campbeltown-built Ajax INS 82 (Yard No. 12). Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

I am still fishing but when I am onshore I enjoy making model fishing boats, which takes a lot of patience and skill. I have made a model of Argosy INS 79, the first Campbeltown 80 footer, which is in the Fisheries Museum in Lossiemouth. I am currently making a model of the Aquarius INS 222.

Bob Anderson is currently making a model of the Campbeltown-built Aquarius INS 222. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

Bob Anderson is currently making a model of the Campbeltown-built Aquarius INS 222. Photo courtesy of Bob Anderson.

 

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3 Comments

  1. Hamish McPherson03/10/2019 at 10:19 am

    Well done Bob. Great work and a lot of skill there

    Reply
  2. Jiimy Gault07/10/2019 at 12:28 pm

    Brilliant read Bob, well done. Great work with the models. You must have the patience of a saint.

    Reply
  3. Jan MacDonald08/10/2019 at 5:24 pm

    Very interesting article & photos it’s great that all this is being saved for future generations. The models are terrific

    Reply

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